Home Prisoners 20/June/2021 01:49 PM

Palestinians demonstrate in Nablus in support of hunger-striking detainees

Palestinians demonstrate in Nablus in support of hunger-striking detainees
Palestinian political prisoners seen in Ofer Prison, southwest of Ramallah (File photo)

NABLUS, Sunday, June 20, 2021 (WAFA) – Dozens of Palestinians took part today in a vigil outside the office of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Nablus, north of the occupied West Bank, in support of hunger-striking detainees in Israeli jails.

The protesters waved photos of the hunger-striking detainees and banners calling for immediate action to release them and to hold Israel to account for its violations of the prisoners’ human rights.

The participants handed a letter to the ICRC urging it to uphold its role and mandate and to submit the necessary reports to the United Nations General Assembly and the Security Council, on the suffering of Palestinian prisoners inside the Israeli prisons.

To be noted, three Palestinian prisoners in the Israeli prisons are currently on open-ended hunger strike in protest of their administrative detention, without a charge or trial.

Ghadanfar Abu Atwan, 28 years old, from the town of Dura, south of Hebron, has been on hunger strike for the 47 days in protest of being detained without a charge or trial. He’s currently held captive in Kaplan Medical Center.

Khader Adnan, 43, from Jenin, also remains on his hunger strike for the 22nd day in a row in protest of his administrative detention.

He’s currently held in difficult conditions in Al-Jalma Detention Center.

Jamal Al-Taweel, 59 years old, from Ramallah, continues his hunger strike for the 18th day in a row, against to the Israeli authorities’ continued administrative detention of his daughter, journalist Bushra Al-Taweel. He’s currently held in solitary confinement in Hasharon Prison.

Israel's widely condemned practice of administrative detention allows the detention of Palestinians without charge or trial for renewable intervals ranging between three and six months based on undisclosed evidence that even a detainee’s lawyer is barred from viewing.

M.N

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